Saturday, 18 August 2018 06:23

Unhealthy levels of chemicals present in cereals, report says

Written by 
Rate this item
(0 votes)

 

Traces of glyphosate, an active chemical ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup weed killer, was found in two among the 45 products that were made with oats. For the uninitiated, glyphosate is carcinogenic.

 

A report by Environmental Working Group (EWG) has stated that several of America’s popular breakfast food come with a “hefty dose of the weed-killing poison” as quoted by a report in CNN. Traces of glyphosate, an active chemical ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup weed killer, was found in two among the 45 products that were made with oats. It was also reported that in 31 of the samples, the glyphosate level was more than what is believed to be healthy for children.

 

Some of those products included Back to Nature Classic Granola, Quaker Dinosaur Egg Instant Oats, Cheerios Toasted Whole Grain Oat Cereal, Lucky Charms, Quaker Steel Cut Oats and Kellog’s Nutrigrain Strawberry Breakfast Bars, Nature Valley Granola Protein Oats ‘n Honey, Great Value Original Instant Oatmeal. This, however, does not mean that they are violating the limit as decided by the Environmental Protection Agency.

 

“I grew up eating Cheerios and Quaker Oats long before they were tainted with glyphosate,” said EWG President Ken Cook as quoted in a report in KARE 11. “No one wants to eat a weed killer for breakfast, and no one should have to do so,” he added. There is also a plan to intimate and petition the EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) to stop using glyphosate.

 

Monsanto, in a statement provided to CBS News, has defended the results and said, “even at the highest level reported… an adult would have to eat 118 pounds of the food item every day for the rest of their life in order to reach the EPA’s limit” for glyphosate residues.

 

However, glyphosate has been identified as carcinogenic by the France-based International Agency for Research on Cancer. It is also listed by California as a chemical that can cause cancer.

 

 

 

Read 174 times Last modified on Saturday, 18 August 2018 14:26